Ubiquitous Academicians

Archive for the ‘Blogging’ Category

The time has come, the walrus said, to speak of many things.

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I should warn you, this post will hardly be titanic in expanse. In fact, it exists simply as a reminder of my continued existence, a phenomenon many of you may be rather surprised by. My life of late has been weighed down by several pursuits, many of which I have enjoyed, and many of which I have not. All, however, especially when coupled with a prolonged bout of writer’s block and a lack of interesting topics, have served the dubious function of preventing me from adding my writings to Ubiquitous Academician.

I have, of late, began my education in the ways of saber fencing, which was a most exhilarating experience for one who has fenced foil most of their life, and perhaps a longer post on the subject is in order.

Also, I have for quite a while wished to write a pair of posts, on the subjects of open-source software and keeping one’s computer organized, both of which I hope to write and post soon.

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Written by Hawk

May 14, 2008 at 11:31 am

Posted in Blogging, Hawk

Tagged with , ,

Nice going WordPress!

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Great. A few minutes after I make one of the lamest posts in the history of humanity, wordpress goes and gives me excellent subject matter.

In case you didn’t notice, wordpress has just – and I mean just – updated their site. (Actually, they could have done it anywhere in the past 24ish hours. That’s what I get for using ScribeFire.)

The appearance seems to be the only thing, but I haven’t explored it very closely yet. So far, my opinions are mixed. It’s new and strange, and I’m somewhat lost.
That having been said, I like what I see. Many options seem more accessible – all my blogs are listed across the top of my window, instead of that silly drop-down menu I had to use before (which is still there; but I can smugly ignore it.)

Actually, it looks similar to Vista. I’m not sure how this is relevant, but it’s an observation I have made.

This post is brief because I’ve already posted today – I just figured I’d weigh in on the new subject matter at hand, while it’s still fresh.

Written by Ethan

April 4, 2008 at 5:26 pm

Posted in Blogging, Ethan

Tagged with , , , , , ,

Another Day, Another Post

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I just took a look at our blog statistics. Boy, what a good way to make myself depressed. Yesterday, we garnered a whopping 7 views – pathetic, compared to the 53 we earned on our debut. Granted, we debuted talking politics, at a time when politics were the absolute hot topic – and we posted about Wisconsin first.
We were also new, interesting and both writing.

Only one of these remains applicable.

Still, I will carry on. I’ll make a big deal about it, moping and whining in a manner unbefitting of an academician. But I’ll do it.

So, on to the actual subject matter of this post. I have resolved not to worm out of being interesting, like I did yesterday. Therefor, my subject is something pathetic. Indeed, today I am writing about when free stuff is good – and when it is not.

Funnily enough, I just listed all sorts of free software I’ve been downloading for my new laptop. Obviously, I am a fan of free stuff. (I’m keeping this to free software/media, not free anything.) Just today, I’ve downloaded even more – Pidgin, FoxLingo, and the most intellectual of all games: Line Rider. I also started OpenOffice, but when my horrible dial-up (I know, I know. I need to upgrade.) informed me that it would take 30+ hours, I put it on hold.
Lots of free software comes from the Mozilla Project (http://www.mozilla.org/), which I cannot praise highly enough. Projects such as this contribute more to innovation than most highly paid professionals.
All of this having been said, sometimes free stuff is not so good. An obvious example is software that comes corrupted with Spyware or viruses – trojans, miners, all sorts of creepy little things that haunt the dreams of my computer and wallet. These are not positive things, for anyone. The sad thing is, pretty much all of them come with free software; what kind of idiot would try to sell someone a virus?
There are other downers.
Not all free software is as good as “comparable” programs that you must purchase. In fact, this is often the case. Lots of free things are free simply because they aren’t good enough to be marketed.

There are many other pros and cons, but this post has gone on long enough. Please let me know what you think – and recommend our blog to your friends! The more readers, the happier we are; the happier we are, the better our writing.

This topic came to me courtesy of Chris Brogan (http://www.chrisbrogan.com/) who maintains a handy list for bloggers just like me – who are caught in a slump.

Written by Ethan

April 4, 2008 at 4:41 pm

Interesting Project

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Hello all!

I don’t have too much to say today, because I’m extremely busy. However, I didn’t want to start off on the downward spiral of not writing. Therefor, I’m going to throw out a discovery I made today, with the help of http://www.stumbleupon.com/

http://www.lookatbook.com/

It’s an interesting art project, created by four artists from New York and N. Ireland. I’d encourage you to check it out – the art is astounding, and some of it extremely thought-provoking.

Now that I’ve made this small contribution, with which I have shifted the responsibility of entertaining you over to said art project, I will clear up a small issue.

You are probably wondering why “Ubiquitous” proceeds “Academicians” – there are two of us, and we live very close together. Therefor, the ubiquity is not physical. Neither are our posts anything close to ubiquitous – sparse is much more accurate. This makes ubiquitous almost the opposite of what we actually are. So, why is it there? Well, for one thing, we like the flow of the title. For another, we like to consider ourselves ubiquitous. Thirdly, at some distant point in the future, we may have far more academicians writing for us, to the point at which our writing staff become ubiquitous.
Call it foresight.

Written by Ethan

April 3, 2008 at 4:29 pm

Warning: Subject matter is absent in this post

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Well, I’m writing again today. I’m not really lingering on my great-grandfather’s death – I’m just picturing him on the other side, having a grand old time with Franklin D. Roosevelt – the greatest man ever born, as far as my Grampa was concerned.

I’ll be attending his funeral, and visiting with family later in the week, so my writing will be sporadic, at best. Still, I’ve got to pen (type, actually) something for today.

I can’t talk about the Oscars – not wholly because I didn’t watch them, but because Nick and I try to keep our subject matter diverse.

 

I’m rather preoccupied with a large essay I’m writing, concerned with the crisis faced by the oceans and the fishing industry. I’ll probably publish it here when I complete it, as well as anywhere I can. I’ve been reading quite a bit of material on the subject, and it’s distressing me greatly.

 

Herewith having filled about one half of my post, I’ll now try to say something of merit.

 

I read an interesting quote a few days ago. I’m not sure who to attribute it to, but whoever realized it was a wise person.

We’re all familiar with the adages “Knowledge is Power” and “Power Corrupts” – both have been in numerous movies, books and other media tidbits.

Well, pair them up. If knowledge is Power and Power Corrupts, shouldn’t we all try to remain stupid?

Now, let’s analyze this obvious contradiction of our principles.

Knowledge is Power – true, right? Well, if one has a vast store of knowledge, theoretically anything can be accomplished, if you know how. Being able to do more stuff gives you power – manipulation is much easier if you are smart enough to handle people.

Power corrupts. This is harder, and probably where the inconsistency can be found. True, power often corrupts – but there are just as many examples of good people staying good when they gain power.

This is not to say that people don’t change when they attain power.

 

Anyways, mull this over, and let me know what you think. I seem to have filled my post well enough, although its not the easiest jumble to comprehend.

Oh well. I have other stuff to do.

 

Written by Ethan

February 26, 2008 at 6:21 pm

Blogging on blogging

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The unfortunate but true fact is that the so called “blogosphere” is an oversaturated space. Aside from a handful of obscure topics, bloggers have touched on nearly every reasonable subject. The chances of creating a popular web log that can compete with any of the prime examples in its particular category are rare, especially if the author lacks exceptional writing skills and a bustling repertoire of fascinating life experiences to record. So, why is it then that we go about creating blogs? Why would someone like me, who knows the unlikeliness of producing a successful blog, still bother to translate his words into a series of pixels?

It’s not that I’m simply disillusioned and believe that my blog will make it to the top. I would like a healthy dose of popularity, but that is not what drives me to blog. What motivates me is getting my opinions, feelings, and beliefs out: translating the abstract, swirling nebulous forms of thought into the far more concrete structures of written language. For I find that I can better examine and process concepts when they are written.

There is, of course, another side of it altogether. Many people blog as a way to rid themselves of emotions that are bottled up within them. They may find it easier to go about said process through the written word rather than the spoken. This particular motivation does not concern me significantly though – I’m content keeping those feelings bottled up unhealthily inside…

To put it far more concisely, think of blogs as diaries or journals (which they obviously very much resemble.) One keeps their diary to themselves for the most part; a diary is not intended as public spectacles, and with that one is content.

Ha. Don’t let this deter you from continuing to read the work of my co-author and I, of course. I may be tempted to cry in a corner should you abandon this blog as a typical subject to read.

Your writer,

Written by Nicholas

February 21, 2008 at 11:04 am